Category Archives: Facebook

Watch These Paint Weed Murals Slowly Take Over The City (Gifs+Video)

I’m inspired by the resilience of weeds. I look for them in the cracks of the sidewalks near the walls I’m about to paint, and then I portray them at a scale that is certainly bigger than the attention we pay them.

“Weeds” is the bad name given to plants found in the wrong place at the wrong time. I’m reclaiming that name, as being a weed has little to do with a plant’s intrinsic value: in the streets I find invasive species as well as benign wildflowers; medicinal herbs and plants of no use to us at all. I find them beautiful regardless, and I paint them all.

That is why I created some of these murals as on-site animations: to let the paintings not just BE, but ACT like weeds! To do this, I paint each stem and leaf in 1cm increments, photographed over hours and days. You can see the resulting video on my link below.

More info: monacaron.com

boredpanda

 

here-are-21-food-hacks-thatll-make-you-run-for-the-kitchen-8-changes-everything-omg20

Here Are 21 Food Hacks That’ll Make You Run For The Kitchen. #8 Changes EVERYTHING… OMG.

Here Are 21 Food Hacks That’ll Make You Run For The Kitchen. #8 Changes EVERYTHING… OMG. Being an adult and preparing food for yourself can be a boring, tiresome business. Fear no more. We have some tips to help you out. We found 21 awesome food hacks that’ll make eating so much better, you won’t know how you even lived before. Preparing for cookouts and parties is easy when you know these ridiculously simple tips. Summer 2014, we’re ready for you.

1.) Make easy cheesy bread with an already-baked loaf.
here-are-21-food-hacks-thatll-make-you-run-for-the-kitchen-8-changes-everything-omg1
2.) Breakfast just got interesting.
3.) Use a peeler to create pretty lemon flowers.
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG
4.) Melted banana split? Yes please.
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG
5.) Use an apple corer on potatoes for quick wedges.
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG
6.) No more sticky popsicle hands.
here-are-21-food-hacks-thatll-make-you-run-for-the-kitchen-8-changes-everything-omg6
7.) Making ice cream sandwiches is easy, if you have a hot, sharp knife.
here-are-21-food-hacks-thatll-make-you-run-for-the-kitchen-8-changes-everything-omg7
8.) Put the egg in the burger. You’ll thank us later.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

9.) Taco holders!Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

10.) Swirly cake is actually easier than it looks.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

11.) Bacon. Pancakes.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

12.) Use a clothespin to make chopsticks foolproof.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

13.) Cheap hangers… or chip clips?
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG
14.) Bye-bye, strawberry stems.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

15.) Bees think they own your drinks. Use muffin/cupcake liners to stop them.
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

16.) Carefully use a balloon and melted chocolate for a fancy, edible bowl.
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

17.) Electric carving knife + bundt cake pan = easy corn on the cob obliteration.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

18.) There’s a new way to peel oranges.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

19.) Wet your fingers. Get the shell out.
Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

20.) AKA, heaven on earth.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

21.) Snacking just got awesome…ly unhealthy.Here Are 21 Food Hacks Thatll Make You Run For The Kitchen 8 Changes EVERYTHING OMG

(H/T Pemzo) You’re welcome. Eating food will never be the same. Share these awesome tips with others by clicking on the button below. Happy snacking!

Facebook Is Quietly Implementing A Plan To Destroy Television

via Business Insider: 

Facebook’s management has recently adopted a new mantra: that Facebook’s audience is the equivalent of three Super Bowls every day. COO Sheryl Sandberg said it on the Q3 2012 earnings call. And vp/global marketing solutions Carolyn Everson said it at our Ignition 2012 conference in New York recently.

tv girl shoes

It turns out that this mantra is a clue to how Facebook intends to start stealing the advertising dollars that currently go to television. Facebook has made three recent moves that all point to an attack on the ad dollars that previously went to TV:

  • Facebook is now the second biggest server of online video, behind YouTube. Although Facebook is a distant second to YouTube, that’s still huge progress. Facebook now shows more video than Yahoo!, VevoMicrosoftAOL and everyone else.
  • Facebook has a partnership with Nielsen, to develop “Nielsen Online Campaign Ratings” (OCR), which measure the audience for Facebook ad campaigns in a similar way to how Nielsen measures TV audiences, by reach and frequency. The result is that it is now a lot easier for big advertisers to compare their TV ROI with their Facebook ROI.
  • Facebook has a partnership with Datalogix, a consumer data company. It allows advertisers — particularly big packaged goods companies like Procter & Gamble and Unilever — to target their own customers with ads inside Facebook, and to compare those campaigns against control groups that did not see them, and thus calculate exactly how many sales any Facebook campaign created.

Put this altogether — along with the notion that Facebook is bigger than the Super Bowl, TV’s ne plus ultra of audiences — and it appears that Facebook sees TV’s old media dollars as ripe for the picking.

 

Lucy Jacobs

Lucy Jacobs / Spruce Media

Spruce COO Lucy Jacobs

“Facebook is 100 percent primed to take down those TV budgets,” according to Lucy Jacobs, COO of Spruce Media, which handles about $150 million in Facebook ad buying annually, from advertisers like Samsung and P&G. The Nielsen aspect allows Facebook campaigns to be measured with “gross ratings points,” which are a measure of the reach and frequency of a campaign as a seen by the target consumers. “They are building a case for moving TV dollars to Facebook as they help brands quantify how Facebook reach and frequency maps to GRP’s,” Jacobs tells us.

 

She notes, of course, that this is not going to happen overnight. It’s still really “easy” for advertisers to continue buying TV: The infrastructure and the habits have been in place for years and will not easily be dismantled.

But it could happen, if Facebook gets its way.

Likewise, Rob Leathern, CEO of Optimal, a social media analytics company, says “I think they’d love that to happen.” Again, like Jacobs, he’s careful to note that the shift of dollars from TV to Facebook would be a long-term event. But, he says, “They’re definitely going to be doing more video stuff next year. … there’s a lot of evidence to suggest that’s gonna be shifting and allowing people to do more interruptive advertising, rather than just the [display ads] on the right hand side. Obviously, TV is the original interruptive medium.”

 

rob leathern optimal

Rob Leather / Twitter

Facebook has no choice: It needs video to prosper.

 

Facebook is actually under some pressure to build a big, robust video offering to fend off international competition. In Russia, Facebook has only 7 million members. The big domestic social network there is VKontakte, which is a rip-off of Facebook. It has 40 million members. The reason it’s popular is because it allows the free streaming of pirated movies. Many, many Russians spend their evenings logging in to a watch a movie (illegally) — free of charge.

Of course, Facebook, can’t offer illegally copied movies. But it can do what Google’s YouTube has done — offer a huge amount of rights-managed video for free. Online video watching is already eating into TV ratings and ad dollars.

This is where it gets really interesting: The main difference between Facebook video and YouTube is that Facebook’s audience is logged-in while it watches, and Facebook can let advertisers target viewers using all its available data on each user. On YouTube, by contrast, a huge chunk of the audience watches anonymously because you do not need to sign-in to see the content.

Facebook video is, therefore, the kind of dream situation that the television business can never hope to match. The only question is, can CEO Mark Zuckerberg build it?

Disclosure: The author owns Facebook stock.

How A Company Targeting Grandparents Became The Most Popular Thing On Facebook You’ve Never Heard Of

via Business Insider: 

 

When you think of the brands that dominate on Facebook, companies like Coca-Cola, Red Bull, and Disney spring to mind. Grandparents.com, not so much. 

But according to Track Social, Grandparents.com was actually the 8th most shared brand on Facebook in the last month and a half — beating out BMW pre-Christmas and NPR during an election season.

Click here to see the most shared grandparent posts>

“Grandparents kind of love being grandparents, and they want other people to know it,” explained SVP and editor-in-chief Ellen Breslau. Which perhaps explains why posts on the company’s Facebook page are getting shared an average of 3,432 times a day.

The belief that grandparents and social media are incompatible is a stereotype of the past. My grandma might sometimes call Facebook FaceSpace, but she’s poked me on it more in the last year than everyone else combined.

Furthermore, as more boomers make the shift into grandparenthood, the soon to be 120 million population (in the U.S., says Grandparents.com) is getting a lot younger and more internet savvy.

“This is the era of Woodstock and rock and roll,” Breslau said.

It’s a younger demographic that isn’t being marketed to by other outlets, particularly in the social media space.

“There’s a lot of competition out there for a lot of different audiences,” said Breslau, who came from the highly saturated world of women’s magazines. “I think there might be something to this idea that no one else is talking about or to grandparents.”

So they’re sharing on Grandparents.com’s Facebook page. A lot.

“One of my staff said it’s become a time when we don’t send cards anymore” Breslau said. “Grandparents always sent Hallmark cards, but maybe [sharing our Facebook posts] is that kind of sentiment.”

The most shared posts are usually the Quotes of the Day — which Breslau admits is “kind of sappy, but very sweet.” That’s followed by comics/cartoons, crafts, photographs, and grandparent news (like of impressive grandparents who do gymnastics and other unconventional activities).

While there are no photo contests yet, that sharable content is on the way.

“I don’t know if they’re on Instagram at the moment,” she said.

History

Grandparents.com started in 2007 as a website offering grandparents activities to do with their grandchildren. It was sold in 2010 and after going public in 2012, transformed into a full service community site with recipe exchanges, lifestyle articles, and money saving tips.

A necessary part of community building on the site, which now serves 700k users a month, was building a Facebook presence as well. Although the Grandparents.com Facebook page launched in 2009, it only had about 6,000 fans at the end of April 2011.

Then came targeted Facebook ads and a build to its current 55k fanbase, which isn’t jaw dropping, but is more engaged than much larger communities.

“The Facebook ads we have running all play on the individual grandparent,” social media coordinator LaToya Monah said. “‘Are you g-ma or mewaw, grampy or grandpa?  Like our page and share your grandparent name!‘ ‘Who’s the little rock star in your life? Like our page & share pics of your grandkids.‘ If you look at our wall you’ll see tons of people sharing their grandparent names, silly things their grandkids have said or done, and photographs of their grandkids.”

Interestingly, Grandparents.com’s actual website doesn’t rely on advertisers as its primary revenue stream. “We are starting to sell insurance, house insurance, and other insurance to this audience,” Breslau said. “No one is able to monetize advertising on the web.”

 

Grandparents.com loves sharing noteworthy grandparent news.

Grandparents.com loves sharing noteworthy grandparent news.

Grandparents.com Facebook

But the most sharable posts by far are the quotes of the day.

But the most sharable posts by far are the quotes of the day.

Grandparents.com Facebook

Even if it’s sappy, this was shared 23.5K times.

Even if it's sappy, this was shared 23.5K times.

Grandparents.com Facebook

The brand page also posts comics …

The brand page also posts comics ...

Grandparents.com Facebook

… crafts …

... crafts ...

Grandparents.com Facebook

… and generational photography. “I don’t know if they’re on Instagram at the moment,” SVP Ellen Breslau said.

... and generational photography. "I don't know if they're on Instagram at the moment," SVP Ellen Breslau said.

Grandparents.com Facebook

 

Facebook accused of massive ‘data grab’ with new service that automatically uploads your phone pictures

via Daily Mail: 

 

 

  • Photo Sync being aggressively promoted to Facebook’s mobile app users
  • It will upload every single picture taken to the social network’s servers
  • Facebook will benefit from huge windfall of data it can commercialise
  • It could use that data to build detailed database of users’ lives

 

Facebook has been accused of a massive ‘data grab’ after encouraging users to allow it to automatically synchronise photos from their mobile devices to the social networks servers.

The social network from Friday began asking users of its mobile apps to activate its new Photo Sync, which will automatically upload each picture to a private album.

Whether or not users decide share the photos on their public newsfeed, Facebook itself will still have access.

That means it will be able to mine those files for their metadata, including the location where the photo was taken, as well as use its facial recognition technology to spot those pictured.

Photo Sync: The new function being promoted to users of Facebook's mobile apps will automatically upload pictures taken from mobile devices to the company's servers - where they can be mined for dataPhoto Sync: The new function being promoted to users of Facebook’s mobile apps will automatically upload pictures taken from mobile devices to the company’s servers – where they can be mined for data

As a result, over time, Facebook will be able to build up a comprehensive database of where users have been, and with whom, from information they automatically give to the company.

Emma Carr, deputy director of civil liberties campaign group Big Brother Watch, said: ‘This provides a stark warning about the loss of control experienced once you have installed an application to your mobile phone.

‘Privacy is clearly at the very back of the Facebook’s mind when creating an application that enables this kind of uploading of photographs to be easier when it, in fact, it should be made more difficult.’

 

The Photo Sync feature, which was launched on Friday with no public announcement from Facebook, is being promoted by a banner at the top of the news feed of its mobile applications.

Once activated it allows the most recent pictures taken on users’ smart phones to be background uploaded straight to a private album on Facebook’s servers, where they will sit pending approval for publication.

A Q&A on Facebook’s help pages stresses that the album remains private, but experts say the social network will benefit from swathes of picture metadata that will enable it to find out unprecedented details about users’ lives.

At its most basic level it could enable them to tailor advertising by location. However, combined with Facebook’s facial recognition technology it could also automatically find out who users have been socialising with and where.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg: Photo Sync is set to provide his company with an avalanche of data it could use to build detailed pictures of users' livesFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg: Photo Sync is set to provide his company with an avalanche of data it could use to build detailed pictures of users’ lives

The same technology could also potentially be used for brand recognition, TechCrunch reported, allowing Facebook to even identify the types of trainers users are wearing and tailor adverts to suit.

The automatic nature of the service also suggests that Facebook is set to gain access to users’ most private photos, including some that may violate its notorious terms of service.

TechCrunch writer John Constine said the service is essentially Facebook’s entry into cloud storage.

‘Facebook wants to help you share your life,’ he wrote. ‘You capture more angles and perspectives of your life through your camera than you might want to share.

‘That means it can either make you decide what to upload and what to share, or eliminate the first decision, take care of that seamlessly in the background, and only ask you to choose what to publish.’

Facebook mobile app users can activate the Photo Sync function by merely clicking ‘Get Started’ on a banner currently displayed at the top of the newsfeed.

Once enabled, every picture taken on the device will be uploaded to the company’s servers with no user interference or further approval needed.

So far the Facebook allows for about 2GB of uploads, with users having to manually delete images to upload more once the limit has been reached.

Facebook says it will ‘generally try to sync your photos as soon as you take them’, but the service also has a range of features to lessen its potential impact on users’ phone bills and the battery life of their phones.

‘When you’re on a cellular network like 3G or 4G, we’ll sync photos at a smaller size (around 100K each), so they’re unlikely to use much of your data plan,’ the company says, adding that larger versions will be synced if the device is connected to a WiFi network.

Unlike Facebook’s facial-recognition technology, which was recently banned in Europe, users will have to opt in to begin using Photo Sync.

However, the potential remains that unsuspecting users will find a host of pictures uploaded to the Internet that had been intended for their eyes only.

Internet security company Sophos warned: ‘You are no longer in charge of what photos you upload to Facebook.

‘In the past, you could decide what images you uploaded to the social network, and which pictures it could analyse for its own purposes.

‘Now, all photos – good and bad – will be available to Facebook.’

Big Brother Watch’s Emma Carr added: ‘This is yet another example of profit coming before privacy. If a company cares about the privacy of its customers it ensures that they are fully aware of how their information is being gathered and for what purposes.

‘Companies that don’t care act like Facebook.’

MailOnline contacted Facebook’s representatives for comment, but none were available.

 

These Are The 10 Most Shared Brands On Facebook Right Now

via Business Insider: 

 

In honor of the holiday “season for sharing,” Track Social decided to take a peek at the most shared brand pages on Facebook over the last 45 days. 

Track Social is an analytic firm that monitors 10,000 brands’ social media activity daily.

This list shows which brands are engaging with their fans right, and represents the brands whose Facebook posts are getting the most shares.

While some brands were expected — news sites definitely had an advantage during the election — others came as a surprise. Who knew, for example, that Grandparents.com even existed, let alone that it was getting shared 3,432 times a day?

Track Social, an analytics firm that monitors 10,000 brands’ social media activity in real time

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/octobers-10-most-liked-facebook-brand-posts-2012-11?op=1#ixzz2DeVbJr18

Track Social, an analytics firm that monitors 10,000 brands’ social media activity in real time,

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/octobers-10-most-liked-facebook-brand-posts-2012-11?op=1#ixzz2DeVTtY2J

Track Social, an analytics firm that monitors 10,000 brands’ social media activity in real time,

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/octobers-10-most-liked-facebook-brand-posts-2012-11?op=1#ixzz2DeVTtY2J

 

10. BMW gets shared 3,288 times a day — that’s quite the stocking stuffer.

9. NPR gets shared 3,425 times a day — NPR regularly updates with breaking news and think pieces.

8. Grandparents.com gets shared 3,432 times a day — Who knew this even existed? My grandma still calls the social network FaceSpace.

7. ABC News gets shared 4,864 times a day — It wants you and your friends to “See the whole picture.”

6. Red Bull gets shared 4,905 times a day — Jumping out of a plane from outer space gets your brand lots of Facebook action.

5. Fox News gets shared 5,870 times a day — There was an election in November, after all.

4. Cheezburger gets shared 6,409 times a day — I can haz social clout!

3. National Geographic gets shared 7,151 times a day — Cute animals do pretty well on Facebook.

2. The Huffington Post is getting shared 7,996 times a day – For those who didn’t share Fox News’ page …

1. Disney’s getting shared 12,713 per day — the togetherness-themed cartoon posts do well with the holiday crowd.

Parents Learn About Daughter’s Death on Facebook

via Jezebel:

 

This is the worst: Seventeen-year-old Jasmine Benjamin, a freshman at Valdosta State University in Georgia, was found dead last Sunday in her dorm’s study area. Her parents claim that no one at the school contacted them, and they found out that their daughter had died on Facebook.

CBS Atlanta reports: “The [parents] said they are distraught because of how they found out about Benjamin’s death – through a friend’s Facebook post. They said university officials never notified them of her death.” And, as Ugonna Okpalaoka writes for The Grio:

The university said the standard procedure in the case of a student’s death is to notify law enforcement in the hometown of the student’s parents or next of kin. The university’s police department reportedly contacted both the Gwinnett County Sherrif’s Department and the Lawrenceville Police Department.

A Gwinnet County sheriff’s deputy officer notified Benjamin’s parents about her death later that Sunday.

They’d already seen the Facebook post by then.

Meanwhile, there are more questions to be answered for Benjamin’s parents. Because police claim that when her body was found, Jasmine Benjamin had been dead for 12 hours… and it’s possible the body had been moved. Apparently students thought Benjamin was just sleeping on the study room couch. “That’s the most disturbing part of it,” her father told a reporter. “Aren’t there RAs? What kind of school is this that they don’t know someone’s laying on the couch — to go check on them after a certain amount of hours?”

The police are waiting on a medical examiner’s report, but it is being investigated as a homicide. Meanwhile, it’s a reminder about How We Live Now: Information is distributed quickly, the chain of communication is not always official, and there are times when social media delivers the unvarnished unfiltered truth… and it’s not necessarily a good thing.

 

 

[CBS AtlantaThe Grio]

via CBS Atlanta:

LAWRENCEVILLE, GA (CBS ATLANTA) –

A Valdosta State University freshman was found dead on campus last weekend and her parents say they found out on Facebook.

Jasmine Benjamin, 17, who studied nursing and lived on campus, was found dead in her dorm’s common study area around noon Nov. 18. Valdosta police believe foul play was involved and are investigating her death as a homicide for now. Her family members said they were told her body may have been moved – which is why authorities suspect foul play.

Benjamin’s mother, Judith Jackson, and her stepfather James Jackson, spoke to CBS Atlanta News on Saturday from their Lawrenceville home because they want answers from the university.

The pair said they are distraught because of how they found out about Benjamin’s death – through a friend’s Facebook post. They said university officials never notified them of her death.

The university said the standard procedure is to contact the law enforcement agency within the hometown of the student’s parents or next of kin.

The university said the Valdosta State University Police Department notified both the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Department and the Lawrenceville Police Department. A Gwinnett County sheriff’s deputy notified Benjamin’s parents of her death on Sunday afternoon.

“For someone to be so insensitive not to reach out to the family, or not even to keep up with what’s going on because it’s a holiday and you’re going away on vacation or whatever you’re doing – it’s very, very hurtful to say the least,” James Jackson said.

Jackson said police told him she had been dead for at least 12 hours before she was found, because passers-by thought she was simply sleeping on the study room couch.

“That’s the most disturbing part of it. Aren’t there RAs?” Jackson said. “What kind of school is this that they don’t know someone’s laying on the couch – to go check on them after a certain amount of hours?”

The university released this statement on Monday:

“Valdosta State University is continuing to work with law enforcement agencies in the their ongoing investigation into the death of Jasmine Benjamin.”

Meanwhile, Valdosta police said they are waiting for an autopsy to determine Benjamin’s cause of death.

Police are looking at surveillance video taken from parts of the dormitory building for clues.

 

Jasmine Benjamin, 17, a nursing student at Valdosta State University, was found dead in her dorm's common study room area last week. (Photo: Facebook/CBS Atlanta)

via Grio:

 

A Valdosta State University freshman’s parents are distraught after finding out about her death on Facebook.

According to CBS Atlanta, Jasmine Benjamin, 17, wasfound dead last Sunday, November 18 in her dorm’s common study room area. Valdosta Police did not suspect foul play at first, but the case has since turned into a homicide investigation because of suspicions that her body was moved.

Benjamin’s mother, Judith, and her stepfather, James, told the local station that university officials never notified them about their daughter’s death. Instead, they learned about it from a friend’s Facebook post.

“For someone to be so insensitive not to reach out to the family, or not even to keep up with what’s going on because it’s a holiday and you’re going away on vacation or whatever you’re doing — it’s very, very hurtful to say the least,” James said.

He said police told him her death went unnoticed for 12 hours because her fellow students thought she was just sleeping on the study room couch.

“That’s the most disturbing part of it. Aren’t there RAs?” he said. “What kind of school is this that they don’t know someone’s laying on the couch — to go check on them after a certain amount of hours?”

The university said the standard procedure in the case of a student’s death is to notify law enforcement  in the hometown of the student’s parents or next of kin. The university’s police department reportedly contacted both the Gwinnett County Sherrif’s Department and the Lawrenceville Police Department.

A Gwinnet County sheriff’s deputy officer notified Benjamin’s parents about her death later that Sunday.

According to the Valdosta Daily Times, police are waiting on a medical examiner’s report before ruling the death as a murder.

“We’re reluctant,” Valdosta Police Department Commander Brian Childress said. “We’re not saying absolute homicide.”

“We have not identified anybody at this point that we are ready to arrest,” he added.

Police are looking for clues in surveillance video from parts of the dorm building.

 

 

Facebook Has Decreased Page Reach, And Here’s Why

via Tech Crunch:

Screen Shot 2012-11-16 at 14.41.34

Editors note: This is a guest post by Robin Grant, Global Managing Director of We Are Social, a social-media agency with offices in New York, London, Paris, Milan, Munich, Singapore, Sydney and São Paulo.

Josh Constine wrote an insightful post last week,debunking the myth that Facebook has decreased page post reach to increase the sales of promoted posts. However, just because that wasn’t the reason, that doesn’t mean that Facebook hasn’t reduced page reach.

Since the end of August there has been a precipitous drop in reach across pages of all sizes, there have been first hand reports of Facebook telling agencies who manage large numbers of pages for clients that they were going to experience a large drop in reach, and data clearly showing this drop from at least three independent sources – Facebook page analytics provider EdgeRank Checker, the head of social measurement at WPP’s Team Detroit and a study conducted by us here at We Are Social in conjunction with Socialbakers.

So We Are Social and Socialbakers went back to the data to see what has happened in the month since our first report, and whether a larger sample of data would lead to the same conclusions.

DATA SHOWS AN AVERAGE 40% DROP IN REACH

Average post organic reach 10th Aug – 2nd Nov, based on 41,051 posts made by 274 sample pages in the period.

As you can see from the graph above, the average post’s organic reach has clearly dropped by over 40% since the end of August, and is showing no signs of levelling off.

Of course, how any one individual page has been affected will vary, and it’s long been known that the more fans a page has, the less reach and engagement it will get as a proportion of its audience, but the drop in reach seems to have affected pages of all sizes fairly equally:

Average post organic reach 10th Aug – 2nd Nov, broken down by page size, based on 41,051 posts made by 274 sample pages in the period.

Interestingly, EdgeRank Checker has just released some follow-up research also showing a big drop in reach from September to October, drilling down into the average reach of different post types:

Their research is showing that plain status update posts don’t seem to be effected by the reach drop to the same extent as photo, video or link updates, but it may be too early to draw any firm conclusions on this.

ENGAGEMENT STAYS CONSTANT

And as we found before, despite the drop in reach, the average page post engagement rate has stayed fairly steady during the period:


Average post engagement rate 10th Aug – 2nd Nov, based on 41,051 posts made by 274 sample pages in the period.

For the average post reach to drop while the average engagement rate stays steady, this must mean that the posts that are getting seen by fans are now getting more engagement.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?

We’ve used hard data to show there has been a drop in Facebook page reach since the end of August. And this drop has been ongoing for over two months – it’s not going away.

It’s clear that Facebook have changed their EdgeRank algorithm to reduce the amount of brands’ Facebook page posts seen in fans’ newsfeeds, but what does this mean?

Well, while some may say this is a deliberate move by Facebook to force page owners to pay for reach using promoted posts, others could reasonably say this is a sensible adjustment to compensate for the growing number of pages that its users are fans of, and the increased number of posts coming from those pages.

But overall, you shouldn’t be too worried. Posts never reached 100% of a pages fan base anyway, with EdgeRank always having determined the posts that pages fans would and wouldn’t see.

WHAT CAN YOU DO ABOUT IT?

Pages are competing for a much smaller ‘share of newsfeed’, so optimizing your posts for engagement now more important than ever. Josh gives some good advice on this in his post:

Focus on publishing high-quality content. Don’t post too often and don’t cram your marketing down people’s throats. Be entertaining and informative. Then follow your analytics closely, consider hiring experts that can help, and refine your strategy.

And, as much as you don’t want to hear this, you’re also gong to have to start spending money to promote your posts. Remember that more engaging posts perform better and spend your money wisely.

AND FACEBOOK’S POSITION ON THIS?

As to Facebook’s comments in Josh’ post:

Just to put an official nail in the coffin of this rumor, I asked news feed manager Cathcart straight-up: “Did Facebook decrease organic Page reach to boost sales of Promoted Posts?” His flat-out answer was “NO.” Cathcart says that for Pages, “the median reach is still above 16 percent as of a month ago” just like it was in February.

Well, you’ll note that Facebook’s representative is saying that Facebook didn’t decrease reach to boost sales of promoted posts, not that they didn’t decrease reach. And as our data shows, the median reach may have been above 16% a month ago, but it’s not today.

When I asked Facebook whether I’d misinterpreted their representative’s comments and if there had indeed been a decrease in reach, they dodged the question by saying:

We’re constantly improving the way stories are shown in newsfeed. With the growing number of pages on Facebook it is important that people see content that is most relevant to them. These findings show that engagement with newsfeed posts has actually increased. At the same time, the number of posts being dismissed as uninteresting or spam has fallen. That’s a great result for page owners and an improved experience for all of us who use Facebook.

I leave you to draw your own conclusions…

[Update from TechCrunch Co-Editor Eric Eldon: This article has been edited by the author to clarify that Josh Constine’s post was not meant to say Page reach absolutely isn’t decreasing, “but that Facebook didn’t purposefully reduce reach to sell more ads.”]

10 Marketers Who Nailed It With Hugely Viral Facebook Posts

via Business Insider:

 

Sometimes the most effective advertising on Facebook is the free kind. Brands are constantly scrambling to engage users on their walls — these are the 10 most successful examples. 

Track Social, an analytics firm that monitors 10,000 brands’ social media activity in real time, told us which specific brand-produced Facebook posts got the most likes in October.

So whose branded posts did the best?

While posts related to big marketing campaigns did well, Red Bull actually wasn’t the only company to get massive likes for Felix Baumgartner’s outer space skydiving stunt, sometimes simple posts did better.

Of course Facebook had a home field advantage with its first ever agency created ad — infamously declaring “Chairs are like Facebook” — one company was able to beat the social media giant with a post that pulls at the heartstrings.

 

10. McDonald’s: 153,049 likes in October. The tried, trusted and familiar can sometimes work well on Facebook. (Total brand Likes are shown at the top of the image, new Likes for the specific posts are at the bottom of the image.)

9. Ferrari: 196,070 likes in October. Yes, sports sponsorships work in social media.

8. Dior: 217,796 likes in October. This post won points because it combines beauty with an extremely unusual image.

7. National Geographic: 220,533 likes in October. NatGeo benefitted from a little bit of ambush marketing here — this was a Red Bull stunt.

6. Walmart: 254,125 likes in October. Polls work. Note the timing: right before Halloween.

5. Disney: 387,700 likes in October. One tactic is to use repurposed content to create shareable memes.

4. Red Bull: 539,610 likes in October. The Baumgartner stunt generated a ton of traditional media headlines too.

3. Subway: 729,412 likes in October. Admit it, it’s hilarious.

2. Facebook: 1,025,154 likes in October. (This one seems a bit unfair.)

1. CoverGirl: 1,278,492 likes in October. Human drama + good cause + beauty = viral.

Google Says Governments Are Trying To Spy On Citizens Now More Than Ever

via Business Insider: 

 

Government surveillance of citizens’ online lives is rising sharply around the world, according to Google’s latest report on requests to remove content and hand over user data to official agencies.

Spying Binoculars

In the first six months of this year, authorities worldwide made 20,939 requests for access to personal data from Google users, including search results, access to Gmail accounts and removal of YouTube videos. Requests have risen steeply from a low of 12,539 in the last six months of 2009, when Google first published its Transparency Report.

Authorities made 1,791 requests for Google to remove 17,746 pieces of content in the first half of 2012, almost twice as many as the 949 requests made in the same period last year, and up from 1,048 requests made in the last six months of 2011.

“This is the sixth time we’ve released this data, and one trend has become clear: government surveillance is on the rise,” Google said in a blog post.

One of the sharpest rises came in requests from Turkey, which held an election on 12 June 2011. Google reported a 1,013% rise in requests from Turkish authorities in the latest reporting period, including 148 requests to remove 426 YouTube videos, Blogger blogs, one Google document and one search result. The contested items allegedly criticised Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (the first president of Turkey), the government or “national identity and values”. Google restricted Turkish users from accessing 63% of the YouTube videos. It did not remove the other content.

The US accounted for the most requests, as it has consistently since the report was launched. US authorities asked for private details of Google users on 7,969 occasions, up from 6,321 in the last reporting period. The number is more than a third of the 20,938 requests for users’ details worldwide. Google fully or partially complied with 90% of those requests.

Over the six months, Google was asked to remove seven YouTube videos that criticised local and state agencies, police and other public officials. It did not comply with these requests.

US figures represent a larger share of the requests for a variety of reasons. Google has a larger number of US users, the US authorities are more familiar with working with Google and foreign countries sometimes make requests for information through US agencies. Those queries are logged as US requests, as Google is not told where the query originated from.

Europe now accounts for five of the top 10 countries making requests for user data. France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK are all in the top 10 in terms of numbers of requests. The number of requests for content removal in the UK shot up 98% and 60% in Spain. In the UK, local police authorities unsuccessfully pressed for Google to remove links to sites that accused the police of obscuring crime and racism. The UK is currently considering a bill that would require internet and phone companies to track and store every citizen’s web and mobile phone use, including social networking sites, without retaining their content, for 12 months.

France and Germany, two countries that have pressed hard for more privacy online, made the most requests out of any European countries in this reporting period. Google complied with fewer than half of all requests in both countries.

The top three reasons cited by governments for the removal of content are defamation, privacy and security. Google also reported that it has received a number of falsified court documents calling on them to remove content.

“The information we disclose is only an isolated sliver showing how governments interact with the internet, since for the most part we don’t know what requests are made of other technology or telecommunications companies. But we’re heartened that in the past year, more companies like DropboxLinkedIn, Sonic.net and Twitter have begun to share their statistics, too. Our hope is that over time, more data will bolster public debate about how we can best keep the internet free and open,” Google said in its blog post.

From January to June 2012, the following countries made the most requests for user data:

• United States (7,969)
• India (2,319)
• Brazil (1,566)
• France (1,546)
• Germany (1,533)

From January to June 2012, the following countries made the most requests to remove content:

• Turkey (501)
• United States (273)
• Germany (247)
• Brazil (191)
• United Kingdom (97)