Category Archives: Weather

Magnitude 5.8 quake near Anchorage, Alaska, knocks items off shelves; no reported injuries

via Yahoo:

 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – A strong earthquake Monday was felt over a 175-mile (280-kilometre) swath of Alaska, including the state’s largest city, but there were no immediate reports of damage beyond items knocked off shelves.

The Alaska and West Coast Tsunami Warning Center said the magnitude-5.8 earthquake occurred at about 4:45 p.m. and was centred about 30 miles (50 kilometres) northwest of Anchorage. The Alaska Earthquake Information Center said the centre was 27 miles (43 kilometres) west of Anchorage.

Guy Urban, a geophysicist at the tsunami warning centre, said the quake wasn’t expected to generate a tsunami.

He said the centre had reports of residents feeling the quake throughout the Anchorage metro area and beyond. It was also felt as far south as the fishing community of Homer, 125 miles (200kilometres) southwest of Anchorage, and in Willow, 50 miles (80 kilometres) north of the city.

“No reports of damage thus far,” said Anchorage police spokesman Lt. Dave Parker, who felt the quake at his home in Wasilla, about 45 miles (70 kilometres) north of Anchorage. “Just a little shaker-upper,” he said.

Beyond the very minor damage of items being knocked off shelves, there were no reports of building collapses or major structural damage, Parker said.

“It hit like a bam, really hard,” said John Owens, who felt the quake at his home in East Anchorage.

That was followed by low shaking, which he estimated to last about 30 seconds. “And then it ended with a second bam,” he said.

Karen Whitworth, an artist with an online gallery, was in her Wasilla studio when the rumbling began. She felt lightheaded as if her inner ears lost their sense of balance. Her paintings were swaying on the wall and the window blinds were going back and forth, but nothing was damaged.

It seemed to last more than a minute, but Whitworth wasn’t scared enough to get out of her chair. Her husband shepherded their young son and daughter under a door.

Alaska is seismically active and has frequent earthquakes, although most are too small or too remote to be felt.

Alaska is the site of the biggest earthquake recorded in North America — a magnitude-9.2 quake on Good Friday 1964 that struck 75 miles (120 kilometres) east of Anchorage on Prince William Sound. The quake and the ensuing tsunami killed 115 people in Alaska and 16 people in California.

Why Did the Coverage Stop?

via Lew Rockwell Blog:

Why did the insistent coverage of Sandy stop so suddenly? Because of the stupidty,  hostility, arrogance, and crookery of FEMA and the rest of central, state, and local governments. and the people’s burning hatred of them in NJ and NY. Such things must not be mentioned, nor the total failure of the Last Responders to prevent looting. As in Katrina, the only way to repel the thieves is to protect your own home with your own friends and family and your own guns. 911 should have a laugh track.

Why Did the Hurricane Sandy Destruction Coverage Stop?

New Jersey roller coaster submerged by Sandy may stay put

via Redding:

In this Nov. 9 file photograph, the roller coaster from an amusement pier rests in the Atlantic Ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., after the region was pounded by Superstorm Sandy. The remains of the roller coaster that was knocked off a New Jersey amusement pier by Superstorm Sandy and partially submerged in the Atlantic Ocean might be left there as a tourist attraction. Seaside Heights Mayor Bill Akers tells WNBC-TV in New York that officials have not made a decision on whether to tear down the coaster. But the mayor says he's working with the Coast Guard to see if the coaster is stable enough to leave it alone because he believes it would make 'a great tourist attraction.'

In this Nov. 9 file photograph, the roller coaster from an amusement pier rests in the Atlantic Ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., after the region was pounded by Superstorm Sandy. The remains of the roller coaster that was knocked off a New Jersey amusement pier by Superstorm Sandy and partially submerged in the Atlantic Ocean might be left there as a tourist attraction. Seaside Heights Mayor Bill Akers tells WNBC-TV in New York that officials have not made a decision on whether to tear down the coaster. But the mayor says he’s working with the Coast Guard to see if the coaster is stable enough to leave it alone because he believes it would make “a great tourist attraction.”

 

SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) — The remains of a roller coaster that was knocked off a New Jersey amusement pier by Superstorm Sandy and partially submerged in the Atlantic Ocean might be left there as a tourist attraction.

Seaside Heights Mayor Bill Akers tells WNBC-TV in New York (http://bit.ly/XCW35T) that officials have not made a decision on whether to tear down the coaster. But the mayor says he’s working with the Coast Guard to see if the coaster is stable enough to leave it alone because he believes it would make “a great tourist attraction.”

Meanwhile, efforts to rebuild the storm-ravaged town are continuing.

Demolition crews have removed the resort’s damaged boardwalk. And Akers says construction on a new boardwalk is expected to begin in January and be ready by Memorial Day.

‘We are living like animals’: Sandy victims hit out after being forced to spend 12 days without power

via Daily Mail:

 

  • An estimated 300 residents in Hicksville, Long Island, took to the street on Saturday, protesting the Long Island Power Authority for ongoing power outages
  • There are still over a quarter million New York customers without power
  • Early on Saturday more than 500 people lined up in Far Rockaway with empty fuel cans
  • President Barack Obama is set to visit hard-hit areas of New York City on Thursday

 

The trail of devastation left by Hurricane Sandy has been long and trying for those still overcoming setbacks.

An estimated 300 residents in Hicksville, Long Island, took to the street on Saturday protesting the Long Island Power Authority at its headquarters for ongoing power outages 12 days after the storm hit the area — the second protest against the energy provider this weekend.

There are still over a quarter million New York customers without power. As of Friday more than 170,000 of those customers were on Long Island, many of them staying in temporary shelters.

Scroll down for video

Hardscrabble living: Residents search through donated clothing piles in the Rockaways, Saturday in the Queens borough of New YorkHardscrabble living: Residents search through donated clothing piles in the Rockaways, Saturday in the Queens borough of New York

 

Charity: Donations are stored and distributed in the Saint Francis de Sales school gymnasium in the Rockaways to help victims of Hurricane Sandy living without power or heat Charity: Donations are stored and distributed in the Saint Francis de Sales school gymnasium in the Rockaways to help victims of Hurricane Sandy living without power or heat

 

Devastation: A volunteer passes a damaged home emblazoned with U.S. flags in the RockawaysDevastation: A volunteer passes a damaged home emblazoned with U.S. flags in the Rockaways

 

More than 500 angry LIPA customers in Oceanside staged a similar protest at a LIPA news conference on Friday saying the energy provider was giving them the run-around and they wanted to know why, CBS reported.

Many of the protestors were chanting ‘LIPA sucks.’

Electric utilities have taken heat for being slow to restore power throughout the region. For a large number of those without power, no electricity means no heat, hot water or hot meals.

Power hungry: LIPA protesters line up outside the company's headquarters in Long Island to voice frustrations over ongoing power outagesPower hungry: LIPA protesters line up outside the company’s headquarters in Long Island to voice frustrations over ongoing power outages

Power plea: A plea to the Long Island Power Authority for electricity to be restored is posted on a barrier in Mastic Beach, New YorkPower plea: A plea to the Long Island Power Authority for electricity to be restored is posted on a barrier in Mastic Beach, New York

 

New Yorkers also faced their second day of gasoline rationing under a system introduced in New Jersey last week, in which cars with odd- and even-numbered license plates can fill up only on alternate days.

‘It’s been terrible,’ Diane Uhlfelder, a former New York City police officer at the protest in Hicksville, told a Reuters reporter.

 

 

‘The kids have been out of school for more than a week,’ Uhlfelder said. ‘All the food is totally ruined, it’s expensive eating out every day, so most of the time it’s McDonald’s, but the cold is the worst. It’s been hell.’

 

Speaking out: The Oceanside board of education speaks at a local school about the lack of service provided by LIPA.Speaking out: The Oceanside board of education speaks at a local school about the lack of service provided by LIPA.

Angry resident: A local Oceanside resident dressed in a wolf costume and held a placard which read Angry resident: A local Oceanside resident dressed in a wolf costume and held a placard which read “LIPA — I don’t bite, I’m cold at night!”

Sandy battered the East Coast on October 29, killing at least 120 people and causing an estimated $50 billion in damage.

The storm destroyed homes around New York City and along the New Jersey Shore, cut off electricity for millions of people and knocked out much of the public transportation system.

Newly re-elected President Barack Obama is set to visit some of the hard-hit areas of New York City on Thursday. Obama put off an earlier visit at the request of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who feared it could hinder relief efforts and put an additional strain on resources, such as available police officers.

Wreckage: Snow from the Nor'Easter storm coats homes burned in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in Breezy Point, QueensWreckage: Snow from the Nor’Easter storm coats homes burned in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in Breezy Point, Queens

 

Nothing left: Damon Rasinya carts debris from his family home past the fire-scorched landscape of Breezy Point Nothing left: Damon Rasinya carts debris from his family home past the fire-scorched landscape of Breezy Point

Early on Saturday in Far Rockaway, a coastal area of New York City devastated by the storm surge, more than 500 people lined up with empty fuel cans.

Word had spread Friday night that a tanker truck carrying 8,000 gallons of free gasoline was to arrive around 10am.

The fuel was delivered under the auspices of the Fuel Relief Fund and apparently funded by an anonymous donor.

‘The guy didn’t want his name used, but he wanted to get gas to these people,’ said a New York Police Department captain, who declined to give his name because he was not authorized to speak to the media. ‘Pretty decent thing to do,’ he said. ‘These people need it bad.’

People wait in line for gasoline at a Hess station in BrooklynPeople wait in line for gasoline at a Hess station in Brooklyn

Rations: Only a quarter of the city's gas stations are currently openRations: Only a quarter of the city’s gas stations are currently open

 

More than a quarter of gas stations in the New York metropolitan area did not have fuel available for sale on Friday, the same number as on Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said.

Millions of New Yorkers to continue to face difficult commutes, with large crowds waiting for trains running on reduced service after transport networks sustained major damage.

Subway services to coastal areas were slowly being restored. Service to Coney Island resumed on Friday, but there was still no service to Far Rockaway. Widespread delays were reported on New Jersey commuter trains.

Hectic: People wait at a crowded subway stop as the city tries to recover from the effects of Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn, New York. Some of the city's transit system is still not operatingHectic: People wait at a crowded subway stop as the city tries to recover from the effects of Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn, New York. Some of the city’s transit system is still not operating

 

Patience: Last week, commuters had been forced to take cars or buses, sparking gridlock across ManhattanPatience: Last week, commuters had been forced to take cars or buses, sparking gridlock across Manhattan

In New York’s Broad Channel community, there was a boat in the middle of a road with a sign that read: ‘Broad Channel – the forgotten town.’

On Saturday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo extended the deadline to February for New Yorkers who lost their income due to the storm to apply for federal assistance.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who toured the Jersey Shore on Friday, said many popular vacation spots will not be fully rebuilt by next summer.

‘This is our Katrina,’ he declared, referring to the hurricane that washed out New Orleans in 2005.

 

Destruction: Much of the Jersey Shore has been ravaged by the unprecedented storm last weekDestruction: Much of the Jersey Shore has been ravaged by the unprecedented storm last week

New allies: Christie has worked with President Barack Obama to help New Jersey recover from Sandy's impactNew allies: Christie has worked with President Barack Obama to help New Jersey recover from Sandy’s impact

Homeowners were able to return to an 18-mile (30-km) barrier island off New Jersey’s Atlantic coast on Saturday, giving some of them their first view of the devastation wrought by Sandy.

Long Beach Island, an enclave of mostly affluent vacation homes, took a direct hit, with some homes washed full of sand and seawater and others destroyed.

The island, with about 10,000 year-round residents and perhaps 10 times that number in the summer, has been closed to residents except for brief visits to retrieve belongings.

There were 289,239 customers without power on Saturday in the states struck by Sandy, a drop of 144,901 from Friday, the U.S. Energy Department said. At the peak 8.5 million were without power.

VIDEO: Governor of New York attacks power authorities over blackouts

 

 


New Jersey to deploy military trucks to serve as polling places

via Fox:

 

New Jersey will deploy military trucks to serve as polling places on Election Day in storm-battered communities, the state secretary of the state announced Thursday during a visit to this flood-ravaged town. The state is also extending the deadline on mail-in ballots.

Department of Defense trucks will be parked at regular polling places that have lost power, as long as the sites are still accessible. Paper ballots will be used.

Republican Secretary of State and Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno said voters will find “a DOD truck with a well-situated National Guardsman and a big sign saying, “Vote Here.”

Guadagno said it was still unclear how many of the state’s 3,000 polling places are without power, but she would know by Friday. Alternate sites are to be identified in cases where polling places are gone, she said.

More than 1.6 million electric customers in New Jersey remained without power Thursday night.

The state also extended the deadline for when county clerks may accept mail-in ballot applications to the close of business Friday. Election officials said they could be handed in as late as Election Day, by the close of the polls.

The secretary of state urged as many people as possible in storm-damaged areas to vote by mail-in ballot because, she said, “obviously in places like Seaside Heights and Sea Bright, there is no polling place, it’s gone.”

“There’s no reason not to vote, there’s no reason not to vote today, there’s certainly no reason not to vote on Tuesday, five days from today,” Guadagno said.

Gov. Chris Christie said that in areas without electricity, voting would again be “old school.”

“You walk up, get a paper ballot, fill it out and hand it back in,” he said.

With paper ballots to be counted, the governor said some races might be more suspenseful.

 

 

Government to pay New Jersey emergency power costs: senators

via Reuters:

Street signs are seen after they were knocked down next to damaged fencing caused by Hurricane Sandy in Bay Head, New Jersey, November 1, 2012. At least 82 people in North America died in the superstorm, which ravaged the northeastern United States on Monday night, and officials said the count could climb higher as rescuers searched house-to-house through coastal towns. REUTERS-Adam Hunger

 

Damaged homes caused by Hurricane Sandy are seen in Bay Head, New Jersey, November 1, 2012. At least 82 people in North America died in the superstorm, which ravaged the northeastern United States on Monday night, and officials said the count could climb higher as rescuers searched house-to-house through coastal towns. REUTERS-Adam Hunger

 

(Reuters) – The federal government will cover 100 percent of emergency power and public transportation costs through November 9 in eight New Jersey counties that were hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, according to the two U.S. senators representing the state.

An aide to Senator Frank Lautenberg told Reuters that FEMA informed the senators of the decision.

Lautenberg and Senator Robert Menendez said they are continuing to request that federal aid “covers as large of a share of the response costs as possible” in the wake of this week’s hurricane that battered the East Coast.

Government to pay New Jersey emergency power costs: senators

The federal government will cover 100 percent of emergency power and public transportation costs through November 9 in eight New Jersey counties that were hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, according to the two U.S. senators representing the state.

New York state asks Washington to cover all storm costs

New York state asks Washington to cover all storm costs

via Yahoo:

 

NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – New York state on Wednesday asked the U.S. federal government to pay all the costs of cleaning up and repairing damage from massive storm Sandy that tore through the Northeast this week and crippled New York City.

Governor Andrew Cuomo said he is asking fellow Democrat, President Barack Obama, to pay 100 percent of the estimated $6 billion bill, at a time that state and local government budgets remain constrained by a weak economic recovery.

That would be a significant change from last year when the federal government covered about 75 percent of the $1.2 billion cost paid by New York to clean up after storm Irene hit the region.

The two U.S. senators from neighboring New Jersey, the other state hit hardest by the storm, also asked that the federal government cover more than the usual share of the cost, given the size of the disaster and the financially strapped local coffers.

“Recent storms in New Jersey have already placed a significant burden on our state and local governments, which have been forced to pay for disaster response and will need federal assistance for recovery from Hurricane Sandy,” Senator Frank Lautenberg and Senator Robert Menendez, both Democrats, wrote in a letter to Obama.

“While we understand the federal share is typically 75 percent of these total costs, the unprecedented and extraordinary extent of damage Hurricane Sandy has caused to our state merits an adjustment to this cost-share to 90 to 100 percent federal coverage,” the two senators said.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, a Republican, did not reply to request of comments.

Obama and Christie toured storm-stricken parts of New Jersey on Wednesday, taking in scenes of flooded roads from the air and telling residents they were moving quickly to get them help.

‘WE CAN’T PRINT MONEY’

New York top finance official, Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, said Washington should foot the bill, because of lingering financial pressures on state and local governments from the 2007-09 recession.

“I think the focus will have to be on Washington, for obvious reasons,” DiNapoli told Reuters in an interview.

“They have greater resources. They can print money; we can’t do that here. And given the fact this is not just a New York disaster, it’s really a national disaster, it’s probably for the federal government to step up and play a significant role.”

“The problem is the state is limited in its resource capacity. We just put out the mid-year report a week or two ago and it really showed tax revenues are down,” DiNapoli said.

Most U.S. states must balance their budgets, unlike the federal government, and it is up to Obama to decide if federal funds can cover all the costs.

“The president has the discretion to go higher. Seventy-five percent is a floor not a ceiling,” said Matt Mayer, a former senior official at the Department of Homeland Security.

If Obama accepts covering all the costs, this would be announced by Federal Emergency management Agency, Mayer said.

Former President George W. Bush allowed 100 percent reimbursement of costs in some states after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, Mayer, who worked at DHS during Bush’s presidency, told Reuters.

Cuomo said in a letter to Obama that “initial estimates project up to $6 billion in lost economic revenue in the greater metropolitan area and the state” due to disruption to business in the world’s financial hub.

Cuomo added that “the significant impact from Hurricane Sandy plainly warrants providing this assistance.”

The state, he said, was still battling multi-building fires, tunnel closures, and power outages at hospitals and other vital facilities. Plus there are destroyed homes and people needing shelter.

“Moreover, the cost to restore the complex electrically driven subway and rail transportation systems after total inundation from saltwater flooding will place a tremendous financial burden on New York state,” Cuomo said in the letter.

In New York alone nearly 2 million homes and businesses are still without power.

Cuomo said federal support is key to making sure state and local governments can respond effectively to the disaster.

New York state is rated AA by Standard and Poor’s and Aa2 by Moody’s and its outstanding debt is the second highest among states, after California.

New Yorkers in fuel scramble as storm-hit pumps dry up

via Yahoo:

People stand in line for fuel at the corner of Hylan Boulevard and Reid Avenue in Staten Island

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Drivers and homeowners scrambled to secure fuel for their cars and generators in the U.S. Northeast on Wednesday as storm-hit gasoline stations started to run dry.

More than half of all gasoline service stations in the New York City area and New Jersey were shut because of depleted fuel supplies and power outages, frustrating attempts to restore normal life, industry officials said.

Reports of long lines, dark stations and empty tanks circulated across the region. Some station owners were unable to pump fuel due to a lack of power, while others quickly ran their tanks dry because of increased demand and logistical problems in delivering fresh supplies.

The lack of working gasoline stations is likely to compound travel problems in the region, with the New York City subway system down until at least Thursday and overland rail and bus services severely disrupted.

Homeowners and businesses relying on back-up generators during the power cuts, including many Wall Street banks in lower Manhattan, may also run short of fuel.

“I don’t have any lights and need this gasoline for my generator,” said Abdul Rahim Anwar at a Getty service station in Gowanus, Brooklyn, as he put two full jerry cans into his trunk.

Tempers flared as a queue of at least 30 cars spilled down the street, with drivers blaring horns, shouting and getting out of their cars. Pump attendant Nadim Amid said the station had already run out of regular gasoline and only had a tiny amount of super unleaded and diesel left.

One driver, a doctor who asked not to be named, said she had driven all the way across New York City from New Jersey, where half of all businesses and homes are still without power. More than 80 percent of filling stations in the state were unable to sell gasoline as of Wednesday morning, said Sal Risalvato, head of the New Jersey Gasoline, Convenience, Automotive Association.

“It’s going to be an ugly few days until we can see both power and supplies restored,” Risalvato said.

Gasoline stations on New York’s Long Island and the city borough of Staten Island also reported shortages, while lengthy lines were seen in the borough of Queens. Commuters may see higher prices at the pumps in the coming days, though oil traders said that with so many people unable to buy gasoline it may eventually lead to a surplus in the region.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency temporarily waived clean gasoline requirements for 16 states on the eastern seaboard through November 20 in a bid to help ease the supply crunch.

GAS BUT NO POWER, POWER BUT NO GAS

Kevin Beyer, president of the Long Island Gasoline Retailers Association in Smithtown, New York, estimated that less than half of all stations were able to sell fuel Wednesday morning.

“I have gas in the ground but no power. For many others they’re facing the opposite problem, with power but no gasoline. For the few stations that are lucky enough to have both they’ve got huge lines out front,” Beyer said.

“With the kind of demand they’re seeing they’re likely to run out of gasoline within the next 24 hours.”

Beyer estimated it could take until the end of next week to get all fuel stations operating again.

New York State and New Jersey fuel retailers sell a combined average of 26 million gallons (620,000 barrels) of gasoline a day, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

The problem is not a severe shortage of gasoline in the Northeast, but widespread power outages and the storm-related logistical problems of getting the fuel from refineries and terminals to those who need it.

Jenn Hibbs, an account director at marketing firm Marden-Kane Inc in Garden City, Long Island, said there was only one gasoline station open within 10 miles of her house. Friends were sharing tips on Facebook about where they could get fuel, but two lines for gas leading to the service station were both over half a mile long.

“It’s making people think about whether they can get to work, whether they have enough gas in the tank to get there and back,” Hibbs said.

A line of cars at a gas station on Route 1 and 9 South in Linden, New Jersey, at one point stretched at least two miles.

PRICES SPIKE

On the New York Mercantile Exchange, oil traders bid up benchmark gasoline future contracts for November delivery, which expire on Wednesday, by as much as 20 cents a gallon during the trading session, before they fell back to settle just 3 cents higher at $2.76.

In Connecticut, the Gasoline & Automotive Service Dealers Of America said around 15 percent of gasoline stations were shut and warned drivers could see higher prices in the coming days.

Four of the region’s six oil refineries were back to full production or increasing run rates on Wednesday. The second-largest – the Bayway plant in New Jersey – was still idle after flooding damage that traders fear could delay its return to full service. Key import terminals were also shut.

“Most of the problems are at the service station level with power and transportation to the stations,” said Ralph Bombardiere, head of the New York State Association of Service Stations and Repair Shops.

Gasoline inventories in the Mid-Atlantic region were 16 percent below last year’s level before the storm, but were enough to cover almost 23 days of total demand.

Power is slowly being restored. The Department of Energy said on Wednesday afternoon that 51 percent of homes and businesses in New Jersey were still without power. That was down from around 65 percent on Tuesday.

New Yorkers in fuel scramble as storm-hit pumps dry up

Christie: Jersey Shore Icons Destroyed

via The Daily Beast: 

 

Christie: Jersey Shore Icons Destroyed

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie got a little nostalgic at a Tuesday press conference describing the devastation that took place along the Garden State’s coast. He talked about the roller coaster and log flume he used to ride as a child vacationing at the shore and the piers and boardwalks where he took his children. “For those of us who are my age, it will not be the same. Many of the iconic things are gone, washed into the ocean,” Christie said. Taking stock of the disaster, Christie said he was grateful that the loss of life had been minimized—the latest count stands at six dead—and roughly 1,000 had been rescued from the flooding.

The New York Times:

 

Aerial View of New Jersey Devastation

Visibly exhausted and somewhat breathless from a tour of Hurricane Sandy’s devastation, Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey took a few minutes on Tuesday evening to take stock of what was lost and mourn what he said could not be replaced.

The vacation spots and haunts of his youth along the Jersey Shore were gone, he said. The roller-coaster and the log flume and the little kiosk that sold sausage and peppers were washed away. The piers and boardwalks where he took his children on vacation and where he was recorded shouting down a critic, ice cream cone in hand, were now buried in muck.

“We’ll rebuild it,” he said in an evening news conference. “But for those of us who are my age, it will not be the same. Many of the iconic things are gone, washed into the ocean.”

Thankfully, Mr. Christie said, the loss of life was minimal. At least six people died in the storm, he said, killed primarily by falling trees. About 1,000 people had been rescued from flooded regions, and 4,500 people remained in shelters, he said.

Thousands remained without potable water, and as many as 2.6 million people had no power, he said. But by Tuesday evening electricity had been restored at Newark Liberty International Airport, and the Garden State Parkway had reopened — with tolls reinstated.

The governor would not venture to guess what the cost of recovery would be: “We’ll be talking about numbers with a ‘B,’ ” he said. But he said federal money and private insurance would ensure that the burdens on the state budget would be minimal.

“Today was a day of sorrow, and we need to feel that,” Mr. Christie said. “But as long as sorrow does not replace resilience, we’ll be fine.”

 

Sandy’s death toll hits 62, as tales of tragedy and heroism emerge from devastation

via Fox News: 

 

little ferry nj sandy rescue.jpg

The death toll from superstorm Sandy is up to 62 and expected to keep climbing as workers comb through floodwaters, rubble and fallen trees in the more than a dozen states affected by the 900-mile-wide weather system.

As the cleanup began, stories of tragedy and heroism emerged. An 8-year-old Pennsylvania boy was crushed by a falling tree when he went out to check on the family’s newborn calves. A New York police officer saved seven members of his family before drowning in raging floodwaters invading the family’s basement. A Brooklyn couple died together when a tree fell on them as they walked their dog – which survived.

 

“We will get through the days ahead by doing what we always do in tough times — by standing together, shoulder to shoulder, ready to help a neighbor, comfort a stranger and get the city we love back on its feet.”

– New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg

 

“We will get through the days ahead by doing what we always do in tough times — by standing together, shoulder to shoulder, ready to help a neighbor, comfort a stranger and get the city we love back on its feet,” New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.

Perhaps no story captured the drama and tragedy of Sandy better than that of NYPD police officer Artur Kasprzak. The 28-year-old drowned Monday night after rescuing seven members of his family, including his 15-month-old son, from the flood waters filling the basement of his Staten Island home. After getting them to safety by ushering them into the attic, Kasprzak went to the basement one more time but never returned, according to an NYPD news release.

Police responded to his family’s desperate 911 call, but scuba divers who arrived in inflatable Zodiac boats and jet skis couldn’t reach the home because of downed power lines snaking through the water.

“He was really a great guy, well-liked, very professional and hard working,” Kasprzak’s commanding officer, Deputy Inspector Edward Winski, told the Daily News. “It was very difficult this morning when I had to tell everyone. It’s heart-breaking, to be honest with you.”

A majority of deaths were caused by falling trees, surging floodwaters and downed electrical wires, especially in New York City, where at least 24 people have been found dead since Monday.

– Couple Jacob Vogelman, and Jessie Streich-Kest were walking their dog in the Ditmas Park section of Brooklyn on Monday evening when a tree fell on them.

– In Queens, a 70-year-old woman was found floating inside her home early Tuesday morning by police after relatives were unable to reach her. Also in Queens, Lauren Abraham, a 23-year-old makeup artist went to the end of her driveway to take pictures during the height of the storm on Monday and stepped into a puddle electrified by a downed wire.

– On Staten Island, officials were checking homes Tuesday afternoon when they found the bodies of John Filipowicz Sr., 50, and his 20-year-old son, John Filipowicz Jr. Both men were crushed by debris in their basement.

– Thirteen-year-old Angela Dresch was found dead after a massive wave slammed into her family’s home on the south shore of Staten Island. her father, George is still missing, and her mother Patricia is clinging to life at Staten Island University Hospital.

– A 54-year-old man from Yonkers, N.Y., was killed instantly when his car struck a tree that had fallen on the Sprain Brook Highway in Westchester County. The impact caused his car to careen into the center embankment, knocking down several other trees.

Sandy took the lives of many in other states as well.

In the town of Pasadena, Md., near Annapolis, a man was killed after a tree fell on his house late Monday evening, just as the monster storm was making landfall.

Near Boston, in Peabody, Mass., a passenger in an SUV was killed after he was thrown from the vehicle as it rolled over and slammed into a guardrail. Two other passengers were ejected, but they and the driver survived.

In Franklin Township, Pa., 8-year-old Matthew Stahl went outside onto his family’s farm to check on the calves. His father told him to run inside, but a falling tree killed the boy before he could reach safety.

In Hawthorne, N.J., a 77-year-old man was killed instantly when a tree crashed into his house.

Sandy’s lethal reach even extended to Canada, where a woman was struck and killed by a sign that fell from a Staples store amid 40 mph winds.

The earliest casualties of superstorm Sandy were crew members of the “HMS Bounty” tall ship off the coast of North Carolina. Claudine Christian, 42, was knocked off the replica ship, which had been featured in several movies, and was found in the turbulent waters of the Atlantic four hours later. Search crews are still hunting for the ship’s captain, Robin Walbridge, who is believed to be wearing a survival suit that can keep him afloat.

The 14 other members of the crew were safely rescued as the ship san