Category Archives: Advertising

A Teen With Down Syndrome Just Landed A Modelling Contract

Madeline Stuart, the courageous and inspiring teen model with Down syndrome whose story we first told here, has just landed her first major modeling contract. Manifesta, a U.S.-based women’s athletic-wear brand that targets women of all shapes, sizes and types, has taken on Stuart as one of their representatives.

The match seems like one made in heaven – after all, Madeline decided to become a model after she lost 44lbs (20kg) in a big to improve her health and slim down. Manifesta, on the other hand, is an athletic apparel brand whose goal is to make and advertise clothing for women of all body types.

“With all that Madeline is doing, we’re so excited to have her represent Manifesta,” the company writes on their blog. “Just as Madeline is committed to expanding people’s ideas of what a model can be, Manifesta is determined to show that the clothing and fashion industry doesn’t have to be exclusionary, that one brand can work for women of various sizes.”

More info: madelinestuart.comFacebook | Instagram | Twitter

Madeline Stuart’s dream was to become a professional model

She also happens to have Down syndrome

After she lost 44lbs (20kg) to keep healthy, she decided to start modeling

She’s been working hard to achieve her dream, with a bit of help from her supportive mother

“She really wants to change the way people discriminate against disability,” said Maddy’s mother

She just became the newest face of Manifesta, a U.S. women’s athletic apparel brand

It is this budding model’s first big professional contract

“People with Down syndrome can do anything, they just do it at their own pace”

“Give them a chance and you will be rewarded beyond your greatest expectations”

“I think it is time people realized that people with Down syndrome can be sexy and beautiful”

“I want people to stop saying ‘I’m sorry’ when I tell them my daughter has Down syndrome, because it’s a very naive statement”

“If the average person could see the beauty Maddy has inside, how loving and caring she is and if that is what people measured beauty on, then most of the models in the world would have Down syndrome”

Photographer Freezes Dancer In Time As She Spins Through Clouds Of Powder

Brussels-based photographer Jeffrey Vanhoutte, together with creative agency Norvell Jefferson, has created a photo series and video that beautifully capture a dancer’s elegant movements with expressive bursts of white powder.

The whole photo/video shoot was organized as an advertisement for Campina Friesland Kievit, a Dutch company that makes coffee creamer. The results, however, are art nonetheless. The team used high-speed cameras to capture slow-motion footage and photos of each cloud of powder left behind by the dancer’s expressive movements.

Vanhoutte has a lot more visually striking work, so be sure to visit his website to see some other great projects!

More info: jeffreyvanhoutte.be | norvelljefferson.com | kievit.com (h/t: mymodernmet)

15 Clever And Powerful Breast Cancer Awareness Ads

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the U.S., so we wanted to take this opportunity to both raise awareness about this disease and to share some of the best breast cancer awareness ads we’ve ever seen.

Most of you know that breast cancer is a potentially deadly disease that is the second leading cause of death among women, but many people remain ignorant of some of the most basic self-inspection techniques that can help women detect their cancer early on, when it’s easier to beat. For more facts about breast cancer, as well as extensive information about early detection and treatment, be sure to visit the National Breast Cancer Foundation’s website. Donations to the foundation of your choice can also help support research or pay for mammograms and other breast health services for women in need.

October: Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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Advertising Agency: Campbell-Ewald Advertising

If Only You Checked Your Breasts As Often

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Advertising Agency: DDB Singapore

Kohberg Bread Supports The Danish Cancer Society

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Kohberg, the largest maufacturer of bread in Denmark, is the proud sponsor of The Danish Cancer Society in their big annual event to fight breast cancer. (Advertising Agency: Envision)

Cleo Magazine Against Breast Cancer

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Advertising Agency: unknown

Breast Cancer Awareness Bra

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A store in Brazil stocked these bras for customers to discover among their regular products. (Advertising Agency: Bolero, Fortaleza, Brazil)

Losing One Can Be This Easy

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Advertising Agency: Jimenezbasic, Philippines

You Can Detect Breast Breast Cancer Early

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When We Talk About Cancer, There’s No Women Or Supewomen

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Advertising Agency: DDB, Maputo, Mozambique

Not Everything That Grows Is Visible

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Advertising Agency: Vaculik Advertising, Slovakia

Unfortunately We Can’t Test Everything For You

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Advertising Agency: FHV BBDO, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

I Don’t Have Time

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Art Director / Copywriter: Angelo Maia

Massaging Breasts Frequently Enables You To Detect Breast Cancer Before It Strikes

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Advertising Agency: Lem, Shanghai, China

If Only Women Paid As Much Attention To Their Breasts As Men Do

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Image credits: nationalbreastcancer.org

Breast Cancer Direct Mail CDs

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Advertising Agency: Publicis, Malaysia

For 90% Of Breast Cancer There Is A Cure That Does Not Leave Signs

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Advertising Agency: LS&Partners, Rome, Italy

 

Source 

Six Companies That Routinely Embarrass Themselves

via Business Insider: 

 

Some companies have made so many horrible marketing or branding decisions, that their insanely crass moves barely even shock us anymore. 

At this point, underage and under-dressed American Apparel model or questionably racist shirt from Urban Outfitters seem to be part of the companies’ advertising strategies.

We’ve highlighted the brands that have the most checkered pasts.

 

6. Abercrombie and Fitch

6. Abercrombie and Fitch

Abercrombie & Fitch

Abercrombie has been making headlines for its questionable labor practices, racially insensitive tee-shirts, sexualization of little girls, and scintillating publication A&F Quarterly (which had mostly naked, young looking models) for the last decade.

One of A&F’s most famous gaffe was selling a tee-shirt with the slogan “Wong Brothers Laundry Service – Two Wongs Can Make It White” in 2002.

One of A&F's most famous gaffe was selling a tee-shirt with the slogan "Wong Brothers Laundry Service – Two Wongs Can Make It White" in 2002.

Other bad-idea tee shirts include past slogans on girls’ tees that read “Available for parties” and “Who needs brains when you have these” in 2005 and “Female students wanted for sexual research” in 2009.

Other bad-idea tee shirts include past slogans on girls' tees that read "Available for parties" and "Who needs brains when you have these" in 2005 and "Female students wanted for sexual research" in 2009.

A&F also has a history of selling sexualized lingerie in pre-teen sizes. In 2002 it pulled underwear with phrases like “Eye Candy” and “Wink Wink.” In 2011 it was criticized for selling push-up bras to 8-14 year olds.

A&F also has a history of selling sexualized lingerie in pre-teen sizes. In 2002 it pulled underwear with phrases like "Eye Candy" and "Wink Wink." In 2011 it was criticized for selling push-up bras to 8-14 year olds.

Speaking of push-ups, an A&F email was leaked to the press that stated: “Now every time we make a mistake […] we will do ten push-ups. Squats for women. This will bring about a great result: we will learn more from our mistakes.”

Speaking of push-ups, an A&F email was leaked to the press that stated: "Now every time we make a mistake [...] we will do ten push-ups. Squats for women. This will bring about a great result: we will learn more from our mistakes."

Shutterstock

That’s only slightly better of when A&F was accused of discrimination against black and Asian employees, forcing a worker with a prosthetic to work in the stockroom, or firing Muslims for wearing headscarves.

5. Spirit Airlines

5. Spirit Airlines

Spirit Airlines strippermobile in Los Angeles

Spirit Airlines

To advertise its cheap flights (with shockingly expensive carry-on fees), Spirit Airlines is known for its cheap, sex-joke laden campaigns.

For example, the airline sent stippermobiles down the streets of Vegas when advertising flights to and from LAX. The strippermobiles read, “I’ll go both ways for $18.”

Spirit is sure to exploit any big event or scandal. Like the secret service / prostitution ring.

Spirit is sure to exploit any big event or scandal. Like the secret service / prostitution ring.

At the height of the Anthony Weiner Twitter scandal, Spirit launched this “Weiner Sale,” alleging that it was “too HARD to resist.”

But crass campaigns aren’t limited to sex scandals. In 2006, Spirit launched the “Hunt for Hoffa” game, asking consumers to dig for Jimmy Hoffa’s body online.

But crass campaigns aren't limited to sex scandals. In 2006, Spirit launched the "Hunt for Hoffa" game, asking consumers to dig for Jimmy Hoffa's body online.

PixelPlacement / Spirit

And of course there was the tasteless BP oil spill-themed promotion.

And of course there was the tasteless BP oil spill-themed promotion.

4. Spencer’s Gifts

4. Spencer's Gifts

The novelty shirt retailer is known for vulgar shirts.

While almost nothing the shop sells is surprising, immigrant phobic shirts (right) and a line of extremely sexist and derogatory tees have recently made headlines.

Earlier this month, the blogoshpere exploded over woman-hating shirts like this:

Earlier this month, the blogoshpere exploded over woman-hating shirts like this:

This.

This.

And this.

And this.

3. PETA

When the animal rights group isn’t throwing blood on fur, it’s coming out with shock-tactic advertising campaigns.

A mild example is when PETA put huge billboards outside of elementary schools in November with cute pictures of puppies, asking kids if they would eat their dog for Thanksgiving.

In general, PETA uses nearly naked celebrities to get its point across. This ad, likening Pamela Anderson to cuts of meat, was banned in Canada.

Critics often question if PETA exploits women in its anti-animal exploitation campaigns.

Critics often question if PETA exploits women in its anti-animal exploitation campaigns.

PETA

Or why PETA chooses to fat-shame.

Even a positive message — that veggies increase sexual stamina — was overshadowed by its questionable campaign critiqued for normalizing violence against women.

Even a positive message — that veggies increase sexual stamina — was overshadowed by its questionable campaign critiqued for normalizing violence against women.

Screen Grab PETA Ad

The ad showed bruised women in neck braces tentatively coming home to their Vegan, sex-crazed boyfriends.

They were suffering from “BWVAKTBOOM: “Boyfriend Went Vegan and Knocked the Bottom out of Me.”

PETA has also infamously compared killing animals for meat to the Holocaust.

PETA has also infamously compared killing animals for meat to the Holocaust.

2. Urban Outfitters

The clothing company has faced a few controversies in the past. (See next slide.)

Urban angered the Anti-Defamation League for selling tee-shirts with Holocaust imagery.

Urban angered the Anti-Defamation League for selling tee-shirts with Holocaust imagery.

Urban Outfitters

Read more here>

And again when it sold tee-shirts in 2005 that read, “New Mexico, Cleaner Than Regular Mexico.”

And again when it sold tee-shirts in 2005 that read, "New Mexico, Cleaner Than Regular Mexico."

Urban Outfitters

The Navajo Nation sued when Urban claimed that it put authentic Navajo designs on underwear and flasks.

The Navajo Nation sued when Urban claimed that it put authentic Navajo designs on underwear and flasks.

Urban Outfitters

Read more here>

And of course there was the time when the retailer introduced a tee-shirt that came in “Obama Black” in 2010.

And of course there was the time when the retailer  introduced a tee-shirt that came in "Obama Black" in 2010.

Urban Outfitters

Urban Outfitters is also one of several defendants in a $28 million lawsuit for printing and selling tee-shirts of then-15-year-old Hailey Clauson that were “salacious” and “provocative.”

Urban Outfitters is also one of several defendants in a $28 million lawsuit for printing and selling tee-shirts of then-15-year-old Hailey Clauson that were "salacious" and "provocative."

1. American Apparel

1. American Apparel

Was anyone really surprised to find out that American Apparel CEO Dov Charney was being sued by an employee for using homophobic and racial slurs before shoving dirt in his face?

(Charney’s lawyer says that this is “contrived and untrue.”)

Charney has faced sexual harassment suits by former employees. (He’s also been accused of hiring based on looks.)

Charney has faced sexual harassment suits by former employees. (He's also been accused of hiring based on looks.)

American Apparel

Read more here.

American Apparel is known for having highly sexualized, often naked models in its ads. But it recently got in trouble for doing it with a model who “appears to be under 16.”

American Apparel is known for having highly sexualized, often naked models in its ads. But it recently got in trouble for doing it with a model who "appears to be under 16."

We went ahead and censored this image of a model who “appears to be under 16.”

www.thesun.co.uk

Read more here.

Which makes sense since the retailer sells tee-shirts saying that “Teenagers do it better.”

Which makes sense since the retailer sells tee-shirts saying that "Teenagers do it better."

American Apparel also showed a lack of common sense when it launched a Hurricane Sandy-themed flash sale — for a storm that killed more than one hundred and left millions without power. “It wasn’t that serious,” Charney said.

American Apparel also showed a lack of common sense when it launched a Hurricane Sandy-themed flash sale — for a storm that killed more than one hundred and left millions without power. "It wasn't that serious," Charney said.

American Apparel

Read more here.

 

Why McDonald’s Asian Customers Never Wait On Line For Food While Americans Still Do

via Business Insider: 

In Asia, McDonald’s allows customers to order food with their mobile phones, or from street kiosks, so that customers have as little contact with staff as possible, according to DDB North America CEO Mark O’Brien. (DDB handles McDonald’s advertising in the U.S.)

Mark O'Brien

“It’s so you don’t have to wait online,” he told us over lunch recently (in New York). In the U.S., of course, McDonald’s customers must mostly walk or drive to the physical store and wait on line to order and receive food.

But in Asia, McDonald’s uses the slogan “If you can’t come to us, we’ll come to you.” The chain has a massive delivery operation, with motorcycle drivers zipping around cities carrying heated and insulated boxes to keep fries hot and McFlurrys cold.

Asian customers just don’t want to stand in line for food, it seems. The company is even considering replacing its call centers with web ordering architecture, so that customers don’t have to deal with any humans until the food is actually delivered.

In France, McDonald’s customers can pay with their mobile phones.

But don’t expect to see any of this in America anytime soon, O’Brien tells us. “McDonald’s might do delivery in select cities” he says. (New York already has a few locations that deliver). But delivery isn’t coming to less dense areas like Los Angeles or the suburbs.

The reason: McDonald’s already invested in a huge drive-through infrastructure.

 

The Worst Men’s Magazine Ads From The ’60s and ’70s

via Business Insider: 

 

We recently compiled lists of the best and worst ads from 2012. It’s instructive to see just how much better modern advertising is compared to “modern” advertising from 40 years ago. 

So we flipped through the pages of “The Male Mystique,” a book about vintage men’s advertising by Jacques Boyreau, and picked out the worst ads from men’s magazines in the 1960s and 1970s.

Some of the brands, like Gordon’s gin and Lee jeans, ran ads that would be regarded as parodies today. Others, like the defunct Broomsticks pants company, appear to have doomed the brands they were trying to promote by tying them too closely to the fads of the time.

 

Even in 1976, some advertisers were still suffering from a 1960s hangover.

Even in 1976, some advertisers were still suffering from a 1960s hangover.

The Male Mystique

Amazingly, pipe-smoking among the 20-something set never caught on.

Amazingly, pipe-smoking among the 20-something set never caught on.

The Male Mystique

You can tell that companies were trying to play off whatever random pop culture events are trendy no matter how irrelevant it is to the brand.

You can tell that companies were trying to play off whatever random pop culture events are trendy no matter how irrelevant it is to the brand.

The Male Mystique

Following the 1967 law requiring cigarette companies to warn consumers about the harmful effects of smoking, this 1975 ad features a surgeon general’s warning.

Following the 1967 law requiring cigarette companies to warn consumers about the harmful effects of smoking, this 1975 ad features a surgeon general's warning.

The Male Mystique

Tiparillo had an extremely odd view about the effect of cigarettes on female musicians.

Tiparillo had an extremely odd view about the effect of cigarettes on female musicians.

The Male Mystique

This 1967 ad looks like it may have provided inspiration for current Axe advertisements.

This 1967 ad looks like it may have provided inspiration for current Axe advertisements.

The Male Mystique

The $10 slacks promoted in this 1969 ad would cost more than $60 today.

The $10 slacks promoted in this 1969 ad would cost more than $60 today.

The Male Mystique

These $3 shirts from 1967 would cost $20 today.

These $3 shirts from 1967 would cost $20 today.

The Male Mystique

In 1971, Lee ran a series of ads with the lion head theme, all with the slogan “Lee can change your image.”

In 1971, Lee ran a series of ads with the lion head theme, all with the slogan "Lee can change your image."

The Male Mystique

Check out the other lion head ads here.

This was how Gordon’s saw itself in 1969.

This was how Gordon's saw itself in 1969.

The Male Mystique

This 1969 ad has fine text that reads “More than a billiard table, a piece of fine furniture. Get one for the (heh, heh) kids.”

This 1969 ad has fine text that reads "More than a billiard table, a piece of fine furniture. Get one for the (heh, heh) kids."

The Men’s Mystique

This Broomsticks slacks ad from 1971 was one of a string of incredibly sexist ads from the company.

This Broomsticks slacks ad from 1971 was one of a string of incredibly sexist ads from the company.

The Male Mystique

This 1971 Hush Puppies ad is one of the company’s most recognizable pieces of vintage promo material. Numerous copies of this ad are currently being sold on eBay.

This 1971 Hush Puppies ad is one of the company's most recognizable pieces of vintage promo material. Numerous copies of this ad are currently being sold on eBay.

The Male Mystique

This 1972 Winston ad features a spin off of the cigarette company’s slogan: “Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.”

This 1972 Winston ad features a spin off of the cigarette company's slogan: "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should."

The Male Mystique

The space obsession of the ’60s and ’70s permeated advertisements during this period as well.

The space obsession of the '60s and '70s permeated advertisements during this period as well.

The Male Mystique

Tipalet’s tagline makes this perhaps the company’s most well-known ad.

Tipalet's tagline makes this perhaps the company's most well-known ad.

The Male Mystique

David Ogilvy’s ‘Man in the Hathaway Shirt,’ with his trademark eye patch, was regarded as the height of adventurous sophistication at the time.

David Ogilvy's 'Man in the Hathaway Shirt,' with his trademark eye patch, was regarded as the height of adventurous sophistication at the time.

The Male Mystique

This ad was racist and made a rape joke at the same time.

This ad was racist and made a rape joke at the same time.

The Male Mystique

Note the text at the bottom of the ad for “design your own” beach jeans.

Note the text at the bottom of the ad for "design your own" beach jeans.

The Male Mystique

Botany 500 suits were worn by many leading TV stars, including Dick Van Dyke and Sherman Hemsley on ‘The Jeffersons.’

Botany 500 suits were worn by many leading TV stars, including Dick Van Dyke and Sherman Hemsley on 'The Jeffersons.'

The Male Mystique

Somehow, the Big Brute brand never survived.

Somehow, the Big Brute brand never survived.

The Male Mystique

This appears to be some sort of Lone Ranger/Jewish joke.

This appears to be some sort of Lone Ranger/Jewish joke.

The Male Mystique

This kind of thing happened all the time in the 1960s.

This kind of thing happened all the time in the 1960s.

The Male Mystique

Sport coat maker Stanley Blacker is still in business today despite this ad.

Sport coat maker Stanley Blacker is still in business today despite this ad.

The Male Mystique

 

This Is What A Victoria’s Secret Sabotage Looks Like

via Business Insider:

Monday at noon, journalists and Victoria’s Secret social media fans were told that the lingerie line was promoting a new campaign: the “consent revolution” that  “promotes consent to fight rape in new panties.”

 

new website featuring women with various body types (as opposed to the highly photoshopped norm) called Pink Loves Consent explained how although previous thongs read “No Peeking” and “Sure Thing,” new ones would say “No Means No” and “Ask First.”

After doing some digging, Jezebel’s Katie Baker found out that the new campaign to increase rape culture awareness was, unsurprisingly, a hoax. Although the woman posing as Molly Reagan, “Media Relations with Victoria’s Secret’s new PINK loves CONSENT line” assured baker that this was legit, Victoria’s Secret owner Limited Brands said that it was not, in fact, an official campaign.

“My only complaint is that you can’t actually buy anything off the site, because now I kind of want some underwear that says “respect” on the crotch,” Baker wrote.

Or underwear like this:

victoria's secret consent sabotage

Pink Loves Consent Screengrab

 

While this campaign was highly suspect straight off the bat — Victoria’s Secret is hardly known for cultural sensitivity  or for promoting healthy body images (just look at the difference between a Dove and VS model) — some people bought into the alleged marketing shift and actually liked it better.

A Victoria’s Secret employee tweeted, ” “I am so happy to currently have a job for a company that stands for something so beautiful!! @LoveConsent #victoriassecret #loveconsent

The Tumblr community was impressed, posting, “i just have to say that victoria’s secret has really got something good going on here. it’s very informative… AND the models are not their typical super-skinny-huge-boobed-7-feet-tall models.”

And then disappointed: “PINK loves consent campaign isn’t real and my heart is weeping.”

The feminist duo known as “FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture” took credit for the hoax. (They were also behind projecting “Rape is Rape,” complimented with stories from rape survivors, on the U.S. Capitol building during the election, when primarily male politicians stumbled along trying to define rape as legitimate or forcible during abortion-related campaigning.

One in four college students report surviving rape.

That’s a message you probably won’t be hearing at Victoria’s Secret’s fashion show tonight.

Business Insider’s 10 Worst Ads of 2012

via Business Insider: 

 

In 2012, some of the worst ads aired had a theme: an overwhelming sense of self-importance. Insisting that everyone take you as seriously as you take yourself can be fatal for brands — as this ranking shows. 

Sure, there are a couple of awful local ads, as always. But you’d be surprised at the big brands who dropped stinkers this year, too. Companies that should have known better, like Harvey Nichols, Chanel and Sidney Frank all made our list.

See the best ads of 2012 here, to get an idea of how high the standard ought to be. And then see what the bottom of the barrel looks like.

 

10. Stanley Steemer: “Rock ‘n Roll carpet,” by The Ron Foth Agency, Columbus, Ohio

Opening your front door to find Twisted Sister’s Dee Snyder screaming at you is most consumers’ worst nightmare. And Snyder looks less than enthusiastic about it in a closeup at the end of the spot, too. But Stanley Steemer believes it’s a selling point. The entire thing stinks of, “who’s the most famous person we can get for the least amount of money, regardless of how irrelevant they are to the carpet cleaning business?”

Correction: Young & Laramore did not create this ad, as we initially stated.

9. Chanel No. 5: “There you are,” by Joe Wright.

On paper, the concept is wonderful: Brad Pitt looks women in the eye and tells them exactly what they want to hear. The execution, however, was all wrong. Pitt seems distracted by the weird script he’s been given. The monologue alone isn’t enough to sustain the concept. (In fact the ad was later recut to add a female character). And the entire thing collapses under the weight of the conceit it is supposed to sustain. Luxury brands need to be taken seriously so that you forget that all they’re doing is selling ephemera. But take yourself too seriously, and no one else will — which is why this ad became an SNL parody days after it was aired.

8. Sydney Frank/Jagermeister – “Uncommon Men,” by Mistress

Jagermeister is the rodeo clown of the drinks world. No one drinks it because they like it, but sometimes it’s not really a party until someone yells “Let’s all do Jager shots! Whoo!” Jager’s challenge, therefore is to solidify it’s place as America’s premier party drink without acknowledging the fact that no one takes it seriously. Some self-effacement was in order. Instead, the brand made the disastrous decision to use an actual rodeo clown as its brand’s hero, and to insist that men can only qualify to drink the stuff if they’re as manly as he is. The result: a hot mess of laugh-out-loud pomposity. (And, presumably, the alienation of its female customers).

7. Gevalia: “Johan,” by Taxi

There’s a way to sell European-import coffee in the U.S., and this isn’t it. “Johan” begins by insulting America’s favorite servant, the humble cup of Joe, and then suggests we’d all be better off receiving a foot massage from a pretentious Euro-trash dude in a private jet. Leaves a bad taste.

6. Society for Abandoned Animals in Hong Kong: “Dead Dogs,” By DraftFCB, Hong Kong

PETA has much to answer for. When it comes to pro-animal advertising, the new “normal” approach in adland is to shock and disgust. Surely there’s a better way? No one is in favor of abandoned dogs, but this ad makes you angry at the SAA’s lowball tactics.

abandoned animals

5. Carmel Car and Limousine: “The Number 6!”

Congratulations, Carmel: You’ve made one of the most annoying commercials of all time! Although Carmel only serves the greater New York area, its ad is so terrible it’s became nationally famous in its own right, even getting a shout-out on The Daily Show. The company appears to be aware of how awful it is, and has since turned the jingle into a contest (the prize is $6,666.)

4. Roller Kingdom of Reno, N.V.: “Say No to Crack, Say Yes to Roller Skating,” by Rhett & Link

Rhett & Link are famous for their faux/ironic local advertising. They make ads that appear to mock their own clients’ poor taste, but succeed because the results are so memorable. The joke may be wearing thin.

3. Oxy: “Man Sized Problems,” by Naked Communications, Melbourne

Promoting an anti-acne cream, this is one of the most disgusting ads of all time. Given the target demo — teen boys — it’s probably incredibly effective. A rep for the agency told AdFreak: “Amazingly we are rather proud of it.”

2. Alibi Bourbon: “Seriously Hard Liquor,” by JayGrey, Australia

It’s one thing to suggest your brand might have a certain down-at-heel, ne’er-do-well cache. It’s another to insult the customers who drink it.

Alibi Bourbon

1. Harvey Nichols: “Try To Contain Your Excitement,” by DDB

Harvey Nicks made one of the smartest ads of the year March, titled “Walk of Shame,” which suggested to women that sneaking home early in the morning after a late-night hookup might be less embarrassing if you were dressed in something that looked good. It followed up with this unpleasant mess, a huge misstep for such a high-end brand.

Harvey Nichols ad guess

Business Insider’s 10 Best Ads of 2012

via Business Insider: 

Choosing the 10 best ads of 2012 is a tough task. The line between “the great” and “the absolute best” is thin indeed.

As usual, there’s a broad mix of comedy, drama and eye-popping special effects. Overall, it reaffirms our faith that the ad business holds some of the most talented creative people on the planet. Most of these ads are way more interesting than anything you’ll see on TV or at the movies. (See last year’s for an appetizer.)

This ranking is entirely subjective: we looked at originality, entertainment value, and success stories. These were the brands and the campaigns that stood out. Congratulations to everyone who made the list.

Some of the winners will be familiar. But seven of them are more obscure and you’ll see them for the first time here, because broadcast TV in the U.S. is no longer the premier showcase for the world’s best work. (Following the Top 10 list is a compilation of runners up that nearly made the cut but were ultimately rejected.)

The surprise at No.1? Well, if you haven’t seen it — and most people have not — you’re in for a treat.

You can also check out the 10 worst ads of 2012 here. But first …

 

10. Cartier: “L’Odyssée de Cartier,” by Marcel, Paris

Beautifully crafted. Exquisitely shot. Epic in scale. Incredible attention to detail. And wonderfully silly. This story of a snow leopard’s quest — via golden dragon, giant Dali elephant, and 19th Century flying machine — to meet the bejeweled Parisian babe of its dreams is completely entertaining.

9. Samsung: “The Next Big Thing Is Already Here,” by 72andSunny

This was the ad that perfectly positioned Samsung as the anti-Apple with the introduction of the Galaxy S III. The big, flat phone made iPhone 5 look small and dated, and this ad infuriated Apple fanboys worldwide.

8. Old Milwaukee: “Will Ferrell Super Bowl Spot,” by Funny Or Die

Old Mil’ never bought a Super Bowl ad, and aired this Ferrell skit only on local TV in the middle of nowhere. Yet it’s been seen by millions on YouTube and elsewhere. The climax of an hilarious hidden-in-plain site media strategy by the brewer.

7. Chrysler: “Halftime in America,” by Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.

Chrysler won the Super Bowl in 2012 with this halftime ad that cleverly played off three themes: “Detroit in recession” from last year’s Eminem ad; the presidential election campaign; and the Big Game itself. Republicans hated it. The fact that Clint eventually turned out for Mitt Romney — and looked weird and crazy in the process — proved that W+K successfully harnessed Eastwood’s special brand of insanity in way that others could not.

6. Procter & Gamble: “Best Job,” by Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.

This was the ad that had the planet wiping away its tears during the Olympic games.

5. TNT: “A Dramatic Surprise On A Quiet Square,” by Duval Guillaume, Belgium

It’s the viral video of the year: 38 million people have viewed this candid camera epic in which innocent bystanders in a small Belgian town are subjected to an onslaught of American action movie cliches, simply because they pressed a button marked “Push to add drama.”

4. Water Is Life: “#FirstWorldProblems,” by DDB New York

This spot was massive on Twitter in the days after it launched because it combined a social media strategy — the war on self-indulgent Twitter jerks — with a guilt-inducing message about real life in our Third World neighbor. And it didn’t use the usual cliches (skeletal kids surrounded by flies) to do it. Instead, the spot credits the people it’s trying to help with a level of ironic media literacy necessary to talk directly to the American cynic.

3. Nike: “Jogger,” by Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.

Nike wasn’t an Olympic sponsor but it ambushed the games with this brilliant but simple commercial. We said when it launched that “this thoughtful, unexpectedly moving video of an overweight pre-teenager, Nathan, forcing himself to run down a lonely road in London, Ohio, is fantastic. Note that it’s filmed in a single, unedited take.”

2. NSPCC: “The $#*! Kids Say,” by Inferno, London

It’s rare that an ad can start by making you laugh and then, by the end, have you choking back the tears, but this one comes pretty close. It starts with an adorable tot describing her worldview — “Rabbits are scary!” — and then it’s too late. You’ve been lulled into watching the most disturbing anti-child abuse ad since last year’s Irish epic from Ogilvy. Note how wonderful the acting is.

1. The Guardian: “Three Little Pigs,” by BBH London

What would happen if the fairy tale of the Three Little Pigs was a real, modern day event? Blown out of proportion by the media, and then fact-checked by bloggers and social media, it turns out that the “blow your house in” scandal has its origins in the mortgage crisis. Easily the most original idea of the year. Bravo.

The 10 Most Viral Ads Of 2012

via Business Insider: 

 

According to Unruly Media — which tracks not only what videos people watch but also what they share — the most viral ad of 2012 was a 30-minute-long spot for Kony 2012. People shared the controversial ad 10 million times, which is more than twice as much as people shared VW’s “The Force,” the most shared ad of 2011.

Other highlights included TNT’s real-life stunt in which chaos rained down on an unsuspecting public square in Belgium (see how they did it here) and PBS’s auto-tuned Mr. Roger’s mashup.

In total, the top 500 ads of the year were shared 113 million times, 21 percent more than 2011, Unruly says. This year’s top 10 ads alone were shared 28 million times, which is 10 million shares more than in 2011.

 

10. PBS Studio’s “Mister Rogers Remixed, Garden of your Mind” auto-tuned the beloved childhood hero. It was shared 1,045,039 times.

9. Volkswagen’s incredible “Bark Side” Super Bowl teaser, in which costumed dogs barked the Imperial March, was shared 1,127,479 times.

8. When Chevrolet enlisted OK Go to help with its campaign, the video “Needing/Getting” got shared 1,140,769 times.

7. Melbourne Metro’s “Dumb Ways to Die” is a newcomer, but was already shared 1,217,751 times.

6. Dancesport Studio’s self-explanatory “Two-Year-Old Dancing the Jive” was shared 2,094,766 times.

5. P&G’s “Best Job” was a tribute to the mothers of Olympians. It was shared 2,227,528 times.

4. DC Shoes’ high octane “Gymkhana 5 was shared 2,292,354 times.

3. Abercrombie & Fitch’s recreation of “Call Me Maybe” was shared 2,435,774 times.

2. TNT’s “Dramatic Surprise on a Quiet Square” brought chaos to an unsuspecting group of bystanders. The ad was shared 4,352,283 times.

1. Kony 2012’s thirty-minute long “Invisible Children” video was shared 10,068,928 times.